E-commerce is just the starting line for a more digitized apparel industry, according to Munich Fabric Start.

The international fabric trade fair, held at the Munich Order Center (MOC) Sept. 5-7, will take a deeper dive into the digital world and examine how pending revolutions in the fashion industry supply chain—from design and production, to goods management at the POS—will alter the manufacturing and retail landscapes.

In addition to extended areas and its popular trend seminars, Munich Fabric Start will kick off the Autumn/Winter 18-19 show with a new format, Munich Apparel Source. With Munich Apparel Source, located nearby at MTC, Munich Fabric Start aims to add a comprehensive portfolio of manufacturing and sourcing services and products for the fashion industry in one location. Shuttle buses will be provided for guests between MOC and MTC.

Munich Fabric Start Managing Director Sebastian Klinder said a prime goal of this complementary trade fair format is to present new sourcing nations and their potential solutions and services. “In Munich, we offer them a platform to be able to present these in their entirety and in continuity, to forge new contacts, exchange ideas and to develop possible new business relationships,” he explained. The show will present a spectrum of services offered by over 200 multi-national sourcing offices and manufacturing companies with European designers and ready-to-wear producers, including cut-make-trim (CMT) solutions and high-end finished goods production.

Klinder described Munich Fabric Start as in a “comfortable position” to be able to expand its depth of exhibitors. “Nowadays, many sourcing companies have started offering A to Z process solutions. They cover both design as well as the entire manufacturing process including the sourcing of fabrics and findings. Consequently, it is only logical to present these segments in their entirety and continuity,” he explained.

On the first day of the trade fair, Munich Fabric Source will host the Patterns X.0 conference focused on digitalization and its related structures within the entire textile chain through to the end consumer. Seminars will examine the blueprint for the re-design of fashion production, what exactly can be digitalized in fashion and the megatrends the industry needs to prepare for. Speakers will also discuss vertical sourcing and how online retailers like Amazon and Asos are speeding up production and procurement.

“Digitalization is already now determining production processes in many areas in the most varied sectors of industry. And in the future it will impact these much more starkly, and will therefore also change them,” said Klinder.

Munich Apparel Source is just one part of the trade fair’s mission to better educate and prepare designers for the upcoming season. Munich Fabric Start is extending the denim event Bluezone to three days to better align it with the rest of the show. It will also introduce The Infinite, a concept that takes a closer look at how denim brands can quickly adapt to trends and consumer needs.

Munich Fabric Start

A hub for new technologies, future fabrics, bionomics and macro trends, Keyhouse returns bigger and better with an open, lighter and more minimalist design. “We are delighted at this positive feedback and the great demand from new exhibitors and exhibitor groups,” Klinder said.

Keyhouse will debut The MicroFactory, a collaboration with Deutsche Institute für Deutsch. Here, attendees will be provided the opportunity to test the Industry 4.0 for their business on site by making a custom running shirt made of Schoeller fabrics, from CAD to assembly.

“The clothing industry in its current structures will certainly not be up to meeting the ever-growing demands of the market and consumers in many areas,” Klinder added. “Here, new approaches and process solutions must be found. As a trade fair organizer, we see it our prime task to give these new developments a forum.”

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