The world’s most popular search engine says denim trends are building momentum.

Gathering data on the most search phrases during 2016 in both the US and UK, Google has released their second annual report focusing on what fashion trends grew in popularity during 2016, and which ones began to fade away.

Google found that both biker jeans and ripped jeans are “sustained risers” for 2016, indicating a “steady in growth [in popularity] over the past years. Compared to the “seasonal risers” like bomber jackets, or the “rising stars” like body suits, Google’s data shows that these two trends, specific to denim, experienced the most promising rise in popularity during 2016.

For declining trends, Google reports that drop crotch pants and acid-wash jeans fell out of favor during 2016.

Focusing on the aesthetic trends that drive these different items, Google cited “Military Chic” as one of the most searched trends, with bomber jackets, biker jeans and ripped jeans falling into this category for both men and women. Google also confirmed that “embroidered” was the most popular additional keyword entered in both the UK and the US.

Google also found that denim was a common material consumers searched for in bomber jackets, though it finished below the top five with leather and satin being the most popular material choices. However, denim bomber searches increased this year by 155 percent in the US and 99 percent in the UK.

For women’s trends, Google reports that off-the-shoulder tops are a rising star in both countries polled. Lace proved most popular, but Google shows that denim and chambray are seeing strong growth in both markets, coming in at number two.

Similar to off-the-shoulder tops, jean rompers were also trending across both countries with denim as the second most popular material behind lace.

For their trend recap, Google noted that kids’ clothing is beginning to reflect adult clothing in terms of interest. Google also reaffirms that fashion is becoming more androgynous, noticing that garments like bomber jackets and rompers are being paired with gendered terms like “men” and “women”.

“There’s a revolution going on,” said Ellen Sideri, founder of ESP Trendlab to Google. “The characteristics of masculine and feminine are not owned by each gender, they’re owned in common. The walls are coming down.”

Google also points out that consumers want many versions of one trend. If everyone and their brother has a bomber jacket, they are looking for more personalized versions like harem rompers or cropped bombers.