Abercrombie & Fitch (A&F) is dialing down its shirtless image and shedding the last reminders of its controversial, image-obsessed CEO Mike Jeffries, who retired in December 2014.

The teen retailer revealed Friday that it is abandoning its sexualized marketing on shopping bags and in-store imagery, as well as its use of shirtless models to promote store openings and special events, with the exception of promotional material for its signature cologne, Fierce.

Fortune reported that store associates at A&F, which had a reputation for their aloof style of selling, will no longer be called “models” or be hired for their physical appearance, and will be called “brand representatives.” Employees will also no longer be required to purchase and wear A&F apparel while on the job.

The changes are part of the retailer’s renewed focus on customer service. Store managers will be incentivized with new sales goals and other incentives to drive sales. “Brand representatives” will be encouraged to share their knowledge of the product to customers. A&F stores will also receive a warm makeover, with adjustment to its lighting and scent to create a more pleasurable shopping experience.

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